Global Outreach

Global Outreach

(H) 76cm x (W) 101cm

(H) 30" x (W) 40"

Acrylic on Canvas

2nd Prize - 2016 Royal Australian Air Force Heritage Awards

In the permanent collection of the RAAF

The impressive Boeing C-17A Globemaster III was entered into Royal Australian Air Force service during 2006. Since then the massive transport aircraft have supplemented the C-130 Hercules fleet. Globemasters have greatly extended the RAAF’s strategic airlift capabilities providing the versatility to rapidly deploy vehicles, troops and supplies anywhere in the world. In 2016, 36 Squadron’s C-17s at Amberley are regularly on operations and include support for humanitarian and disaster relief missions. In these latter roles Globemasters have provided an unrivalled outreach to supply Australian Aid during missions such as Operation Philippines Assist – the response to Typhoon Haiyan.

Southern Tails Strike

Southern Tails Strike

(H) 45cm x (W) 65cm

(H) 17.7" x (W) 25.5"

Acrylic on Canva

Mustangs of 3 Squadron RAAF, led by S/Ldr Nash in CV-P, bomb the marshalling yards at Bjelovar, in the former Yugoslavia on 2nd December, 1944.

SOLD

Cold Lines

Cold Lines

(H) 60cm x (W) 90cm

(H) " x (W) "

Acrylic on Canvas

John Curchin was an Australian who flew with Royal Air Force during the Battle of Britain. Having been assigned to 609 ‘West Riding’ Squadron just after the Dunkirk withdrawal, Curchin soon became a respected member of the unit and eventual flight leader and DFC recipient. As the Luftwaffe intensified their attacks during the English Summer of 1940 the Australian was regularly in combat flying Spitfires. Curchin also became a leading ace during this period. In this companion painting to Defending the Capital, Curchin and his wingman have been momentarily caught off guard by a diving Messerschmitt. The Spitfire and Bf109 were evenly matched so the outcome of this particular encounter could go either way. Scenes like this were a daily occurrence for the pilots who defended London during 1940.

Defending the Capital

Defending the Capital

(H) 60cm x (W) 90cm

Acrylic on Canvas

During August 1940 the Battle of Britain continued to rage. The German Luftwaffe gradually began to shift their bombing focus towards the British airfields before later launching full out attacks against the capital London. The ubiquitous Hurricane and Spitfire, flown by pilots from several nations, bore the brunt of combat. 601 ‘County of London’ Squadron was a pre-war Auxillary squadron that earned the nickname ‘millionaires squadron’ due to the number of affluent pilots among the ranks. By WWII the unit was far more cosmopolitan! In early August 1940 Sydney born Howard Mayers had joined the squadron. He was soon thrown into action along with the daily routine of sleep deprivation, stress and extremely dangerous missions. In this depiction, Mayers, along with other pilots of 601 Squadron, are about to launch an attack against Do17 bombers over the Thames Estuary. Mayers was one of the leading Australian fighter pilots during the Battle of Britain and an ace. He survived the battles of 1940 and was later sent to the Middle East to command a squadron and then a Wing. Ultimately, Mayers was decorated with a DSO, DFC and Bar and Mentioned in Despatches although, sadly, did not survive the war. 

Beyond the 38th Parallel

Beyond the 38th Parallel

(H) 76cm x (W) 101cm

(H) 30" x (W) 40"

Acrylic on Canvas

Finalist - 2014 Royal Australian Air Force Heritage Awards

In June 1950 North Korea invaded the South and the United Nations Security Council was forced to respond. 77 Squadron RAAF was stationed in Japan at this time, as part of the British Commonwealth Occupational Force, and became one of the first United Nations countries to enter combat. Initially armed with the piston engine F-51 Mustang the decision to re-equip 77 Squadron with modern jets had long been considered a priority and this finally occurred in July 1951. The Australian unit returned to  Korea under the aggressive leadership of WWII veteran S/Ldr ‘Dick’ Cresswell and armed with the Gloster Meteor F.8. On 27th October 1951 77 Squadron were tasked with escorting B-29s of the 19th Bomb Group to targets at Sinanju in North Korea. During the return leg several enemy MiG-15s were seen at higher altitude before diving towards the formation. The Australians doggedly stuck to their task and only broke formation when the bombers came under immediate attack. In the heat of jet combat it was quite often impossible to note results of an attack. F/O Les Reading believed to have damaged a MiG with cannon fire and it appears likely B-29s gunners may have landed destructive blows against other aircraft. 

Pressure Point

Pressure Point

(H) 76cm x (W) 101cm

(H) 30" x (W) 40"

Acrylic on Canvas

Available as Print

2nd Prize - 2012 Royal Australian Air Force Heritage Awards

In the permanent collection of the RAAF

On 20th June 1943 bombers and fighters of the IJAAF bombed Darwin. 452 (Aus) Sqn RAF and 54 Sqn RAF intercepted NE of the harbour while 457 (Aus) Sqn RAF were sent to investigate another plot further north. By the time 457 Sqn re-engaged, Ki-49 ‘Helen’ bombers of the 61st Sentai were almost directly over the township. F/Lt P.H. Watson DFC led the three sections of 457 Sqn Spitfires into a dangerous and difficult head on attack. White flight repeated the manoeuvre, however, John ‘Smithy’ Smithson (White 3 - ZP-L, BS190), leading the second section of William ‘Jack’ Halse (White 4 - ZP-D, BS178), noted the difficulty of their position and readjusted for a more favourable quarter attack. Smithson fired at one of the bombers in a dive, then pulled up behind the enemy force with Halse sticking to his leader’s tail. White 3 managed to get a bead on one of the escorting fighters, a Ki-43 ‘Oscar’ of the 59th Sentai, and opened fire with cannon to claim the enemy destroyed. Another ‘Oscar’ had latched onto Halse in ZP-D. Both the Australians were now separately engaged and forced to fight their way out.

Night Spectres

Night Spectres

(H) 63.5cm x (W) 101.5cm

(H) 25” x (W) 40”

Acrylic on Canvas

Highly Commended - 2005 Royal Australian Air Force Heritage Awards

 

2 Squadron (RAAF) was again in action during the Vietnam War, having seen continued service throughout both World Wars and the Malayan Emergency. Australia had deployed several helicopter squadrons and support units to South East Asia, however, 2 Sqn was the sole RAAF-fixed wing strike capability in South Vietnam.  The unit deployed with Canberra bombers in 1967 and was immediately involved on bombing operations.  During four years of service the unit was regarded as one of the pre-eminent bomber squadrons. Superb accuracy was achieved on day and night time missions and the dedicated ground crews provided an enviably high rate of aircraft serviceability. Night Spectres depicts Canberra bombers of 2 Squadron (RAAF) striking targets during the early phases of the Vietnam conflict.

Battle for Australia (Air Raid No.55, June 20th, 1943)

Battle for Australia (Air Raid No.55, June 20th, 1943)

(H) 92cm x (W) 122cm

(H) 36” x (W) 48”

Acrylic on Canvas

Available as Print

 On June 20th, 1943, the Imperial Japanese Army Air Force mounted one of the largest air raids against Northern Australia. Spitfires intercepted a force of Ki-49 ‘Helen’ bombers of the 61st Sentai and Ki-43 ‘Oscar’ fighters of the 59th Sentai as they crossed the northern coastline. In the initial attack 452 Squadron (RAAF) and 54 Squadron (RAF) tore into the attackers claiming several aircraft. The third Spitfire unit, 457 Squadron (RAAF), joined the fray over Darwin. Australian Malta veteran, F/O John Bisley  claimed destruction of a bomber while piloting Spitfire Mk.Vc, QY-N, BS236. Several other Australian combat veterans saw action on this day including Clive Caldwell, Granville Mawer, Ron MacDonald and John Smithson. The pilot of Spitfire Mk.Vc, QY-A, EE607 was P/O Willie ‘Bill’ Nichterlein who lost his life during the same mission.

Keeper of the Flame

Keeper of the Flame

(H) 58cm x (W) 88cm

(H) 22.84” x (W) 34.65”

Acrylic on Canvas Board

People’s Choice - 2002 Royal Australian Air Force Heritage Awards

 Keeper of the Flame portrays the second of two dazzling ‘dump and burns’ performed at the Sydney 2000 Olympic Games as a part of the Closing Ceremony. The 6 Squadron (RAAF) F-111G (A8-271), crewed by F/Lt Andrew Buttsworth and F/O Brad Machan, swooped over Sydney Harbour in a spectacular display that kick started one of the greatest fireworks displays of all time. This unusual non-military deployment of the F-111 strike aircraft was intended to signify the Olympic flame being ‘plucked’ from Sydney. It would then ‘re-ignite’ at the Athens Games in 2004.  The mission was surprisingly fraught with danger. Bogong Moths were thick in numbers around the Sydney skyline and there was a substantial risk these insects could be ingested into the F-111’s intakes!

Escape from Rabat

Escape from Rabat

(H) 30cm x (W) 42cm

(H) 11.81” x (W) 16.54”

Acrylic on Illustration Board

Available as Print

To sway the opinions of Moroccan French Nationals towards the Allied cause, a diplomatic mission of negotiations was planned in 1940.  An official party was despatched to the harbour port of Rabat in a 10 Squadron (RAAF) Sunderland flying boat, captained by Richard Kingsland. After negotiating the tight and crowded Bou Regreg estuary the officials were escorted to the negotiations. Kingsland and his crew remained on board the Sunderland, uneasy with the situation. Soon after, a radio message was received cancelling the mission and ordering an immediate escape. Kingsland and his co-pilot headed to shore and managed to rescue the diplomatic party during the early hours of the morning. In a pursuit by police boats down the narrow confines of the estuary, Kingsland weaved his Sunderland around the many fishing boats. Although clearing most obstacles, the giant aircraft’s port wing float clipped a fishing vessel before powering towards the open sea. The resulting damage would lead to an equally dramatic turn of events back at Gibraltar involving a makeshift platform made from a mattress and rescue launch.

Exercise Kangaroo II: Mirage vs Tomcat

Exercise Kangaroo II: Mirage vs Tomcat

(H) 76cm x (W) 101cm

(H) 30" x (W) 40"

Acrylic on Canvas

Available as Print

2nd Prize - 2008 Royal Australian Air Force Heritage Awards

In the permanent collection of the RAAF

During October of 1976 the United States Navy (USN) and Royal Australian Navy (RAN) along with the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) gathered for Exercise Kangaroo II. During the war games, Dassault Mirage III fighters of 77 Sqn RAAF were pitted against F-14 Tomcats in dissimilar aircraft combat tactics. 77 Sqn’s adversary was the USN’s VF-1 ‘Wolfpack’. This squadron wielded a new frontline strike weapon -  the formidable Grumman F-14 Tomcat. Embarked upon USS Enterprise it was VF-1’s first deployment with the F-14. Although an outstanding long-range interceptor the American fighter was no match for the agile Mirage at close quarters. Pilots of 77 Sqn recorded several gun-camera ‘kills’ against their larger more modern combatants. An outstanding achievement for a fighter that was entering the twilight years of RAAF service.

Flaming Cigar

Flaming Cigar

(H) 30cm x (W) 42cm

(H) 11.81” x (W) 16.54”

Acrylic on Illustration Board

 On the morning of February 19th, 1942, a large force of Japanese aircraft attacked the vital port of Darwin in Northern Australia. Purely by chance a small force of American fighters had returned to Darwin due to deteriorating weather conditions further north. Although fighting valiantly, the P-40s were overwhelmed by the large number of enemy aircraft. Air raids over Darwin continued on a regular basis as the USAAF units were gradually bolstered by increased numbers of fighters. During this period 77 Squadron (RAAF) began training to eventually replace the American units and form part of the Northern defence. By August the Squadron under the command of Squadron Leader Cresswell had moved north for a five month period. On the night of November 2nd, 1942, Cresswell was on patrol northwest of Darwin when he was vectored by radar controllers onto a heading. The three enemy Mitsubishi G4M ‘Betty’ bombers were easily discernable against the moonlit clouds as he closed on the formation and fired. One of the aircraft split from the formation and Cresswell pursued the attacker managing to target the starboard side with tracer bullets. The Betty’s engine burst into flames and descended earthwards before crashing on impact. This was the first night claim by an Australian pilot over native soil.

Leighterton 1918

Leighterton 1918

(H) 30cm x (W) 42cm

(H) 11.81” x (W) 16.54”

Acrylic on Illustration Board

Harry Cobby was the Australian Flying Corp’s (AFC) leading ace of the First World War. As an experienced combat pilot he was posted to 8 Squadron (AFC) during September of 1918 for training duties. Cobby had the unenviable task of combat flight instructor, a job he often described as more dangerous than actual combat. The Squadron was based at Leighterton in Gloucestershire, England, and prepared trainee AFC pilots for posting to an operational unit. In the featured painting, Cobby’s ‘chessboard’ Camel biplane sits poised on the grass in preparation for a morning flight. Two Avro 504Ks sit neatly behind, after being wheeled out from the temporary ‘Bessonaux’ hangars.

Patrolling the Peace: Korean Waters, 1954

Patrolling the Peace: Korean Waters, 1954

(H) 30cm x (W) 42cm

(H) 11.81” x (W) 16.54”

Acrylic on Illustration Board

 

The Korean War was a proving ground for the relatively infant RAN Fleet Air Arm. During the three year period of hostilities Australia’s first aircraft carrier, HMAS Sydney, and the loaned HMAS Vengeance were deployed for patrols in Korean waters. With a mixed compliment of British designed aircraft including Sea Furies and Fireflies, the Australians flew numerous combat missions over enemy territory ranging from troop suppression to bridge busting. With the cessation of hostilities in mid 1953 the RAN remained in the region to provide peace keeping duties. Nat Gould was an experienced WWII combat pilot who had flown with the RAF in Russia and also defended Australia’s Northern frontier from the Japanese threat. He had been lured to the Fleet Air Arm in 1945 and by the onset of the Korean War was looking to once again be in action. However, by the time the Sea Fury equipped 805 Squadron deployed aboard the HMAS Sydney the uneasy truce between North Korean and Allied forces had been negotiated. Gould’s tour became one of protecting the peace which included numerous patrols along the west coast of Korea. The Royal Australian Navy committed several other vessels for duties including the light destroyer HMAS Arunta.

Nowhere to Hide

Nowhere to Hide

(H) 76cm x (W) 101cm

(H) 30" x (W) 40"

Acrylic on Canvas

Available as Print

2nd Prize - 2012 Royal Australian Air Force Heritage Awards

In the permanent collection of the RAAF

Available as Limited Edition Giclee print from the Shop.

On Boxing Day, 26th December 1944, 3 Sqn RAAF were involved in their last fighter versus fighter combat of the conflict. S/Ldr Murray Nash, led an afternoon mission when the Australian Mustangs were bounced by Messerschmitt Bf 109 fighters of the Aeronautica Nazionale Repubblicana (ANR). Tenente Keller succeeded in knocking W/O Jack Quinn’s lagging aircraft from the formation forcing him to bail out. Taking the initiative, Nash led his formation south of Aviano air base in an attempt to trap any returning enemy fighters. Within moments, a single Bf109G-14, ‘Black 8’ piloted by Sotto Tenente Felice Squassoni, was seen to approach. Nash positioned his charges above and behind the fighter before beginning the attack. The Mustangs pursued Squassoni at high speed across the airfield boundary. Nash (CV-N/KH716), F/O William Andrews (CV-A/KH593) and F/O Vincent Thomas (CV-B/KH615) all succeeded in hitting the enemy plane causing Squassoni to crash his 109. He survived, albeit shaken, and was able to extricate himself from the wreck.

Slush

Slush

(H) 30cm x (W) 42cm

(H) 11.81” x (W) 16.54”

Acrylic on Illustration Board

 A detachment of four Hudson bombers of 6 Squadron (RAAF) were sent to Milne Bay from nearby Horn Island in August of 1942.  The crews were to provide bomber support and general reconnaissance to the beleaguered Australian and American forces. Although seemingly a tropical paradise, the personnel at Milne Bay faced atrocious weather and the ever present dangers of disease such as malaria and dysentery. After torrential rains the steel planking airstrips would sink into the thick black mud. Aircraft landing or taking off did so through rivers of watery, muddy slush often damaging or clogging aircraft components such as flaps. However, the war went on. When Japanese ground forces landed on the night of August 25/26th the Hudsons were kept busy strafing enemy barges, stores and troops in support of RAAF Kittyhawks of 75 and 76 Squadrons. The twin engined bombers ably supported the allied ground forces during the entire Milne Bay campaign. Indeed, 6 Squadron Hudsons sighted the cruiser, Tenryu, and destroyer, Arashi, that led to the first combined fighter/bomber/torpedo strike by the RAAF against the Japanese.

Operation Falconer

Operation Falconer

(H) 76cm x (W) 101cm

(H) 30" x (W) 40"

Acrylic on Canvas

1st Prize - 2014 Royal Australian Air Force Heritage Awards

Available as Print

In the permanent collection of the RAAF

In 2003 the Iraqi Regime under Saddam Hussein failed to comply with United Nation’s diplomatic efforts and the Coalition led Operation Iraqi Freedom was launched in response on 19/20th March. A commitment by the Australian Defence Force was initiated under Operation Falconer. The mutli-role capability of the F/A/-18 Hornet was fully tested between 20th March and 2nd May 2003 when the Australian fighter force flew numerous missions ranging from strike and close air support to defensive operations. On 1st April 2003 S/Ldr Glen Beck and his wingman, F/O John Haly, flew a typical strike against Iraqi armour on the roads of South Eastern Iraq. Following marking of targets by USAF A-10s the two Hornets successfully dropped their laser guided GBU-12 bombs before exiting the combat zone. Although most of the deployed aircraft were drawn from 75 Squadron RAAF the Hornets wore a variety of markings reflecting the crews from 3, 75 and 77 Squadrons RAAF. 

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Alpine Duel

Alpine Duel

(H) 30cm x (W) 40cm

(H) 11.8" x (W) 15.7"

Available as a postcard.

Cedric ‘Spike’ Howell combats a Phönix D.IIa of Flik 3J, Austro-Hungarian Air Service over the Italian Alps circa 1918.

Cedric Howell was born in Adelaide, 1896, and was a draughtsman before the outbreak of the First World War. Like so many WWI pilots he first served as an infantryman, including action at Gallipoli and later as a sniper in France. He enlisted in the Royal Flying Corps during late 1916 and went on to gain his wings by mid 1917. Howell was posted to 45 Squadron RFC by the end of the same year and flew his initial patrols over France in Sopwith Camel scout planes. When the unit moved to Italy, Howell’s previous experience as an expert marksman began to show and the Australian became one of the leading fighter aces in theatre. Awards of a Distinguished Service Order, Military Cross and Distinguished Flying Cross added to his impressive tally of enemy aircraft brought down in combat. 

Last Light

Last Light

(H) 30cm x (W) 40cm

(H) 11.8" x (W) 15.7"

Sopwith Snipes of 4 Squadron AFC piloted by Thomas Baker and his wingman stalk a Fokker D.VII during the final hours of daylight during late 1918.

Born in 1897 at Smithfield, Tom Baker worked as a bank clerk prior to WWI. He joined the AIF in 1915 and served with distinction as a member of the 6th Field Artillery Brigade on the Western Front. Baker transferred to the Australian Flying Corps in late 1917 having already received a Military Medal and Bar for actions on the front. As a pilot with 4 Squadron AFC the Australian continued to display exceptional bravery and skill while flying numerous patrols and ground attack missions, firstly in Sopwith Camels and then Sopwith Snipe fighters. The Snipe was one of the premiere allied fighter aircraft of WWI and the Australian manned 4 Squadron became one of the first and only few units to take it into action.  By November 1918 Baker had been appointed a flight commander and was credited with destroying seven enemy machines with a further four deemed out of control. Many of his victories were achieved against the equally superb Fokker D.VII German biplane. Ultimately Baker became the victim of the very same foe when shot down and killed along with two other pilots during a large dogfight on 4th November 1918, only one week before the end of WWI.

Malta: The Vampire Citadel

Malta: The Vampire Citadel

(H) 45cm x (W) 63.5cm

(H) 17.71” x (W) 25”

Acrylic on Illustration Board

2nd Prize – 1999 Royal Australian Air Force Heritage Awards

In the permanent collection of the RAAF